A letter to students and parents

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As examination nears, nervousness is bound to seep in. But if you are unable to complete full course, study little but study thoroughly. This will surely ensure your success in examination, advises The Peeper Times mentor Prof ML Bhan.

Dear Students,

Whether you are a student of school or a college, you have to be clear in your mind that you have to gain knowledge of ‘course’ prescribed through books, and have to pass a test given to you at the end of the year, with qualifying grades or marks. This is the sole purpose of joining a course in an institution. For attaining a qualifying level status, you have to be regular in studies. You might not be able to devote same amount of time daily, but some amount should be spent on studies on daily basis. Let it be a habit. The student should pride himself with this habit.

Seriousness in studies, to whatever extent possible, should be a habit, from ab initio. Attention of parents, with devotion to this point, is essential. Parents, who wish their children to be educated, to whatever extent possible, should make them understand the importance of developing seriousness towards their studies. Once a child acquires some seriousness in behaviour, many future problems of parents towards their children will be solved.

Seriousness in studies on the part of students can help clear their perceptions and fundamentals. This in turn will instill enough confidence and courage in them and they can find solutions to various problems encountered during course study on their own.

Parents will also have to take care that a student during his/her initial stages gets right type of teaching.

Seriousness in studies, to whatever extent possible, should be a habit, from ab initio

For the sake of students, I would like to share one of my experiences. Years back, when my daughter was a 3rd ‘primary’ student, course offered in school included both Urdu and Hindi languages. Since Urdu was not learnt by other members in family, so she became conversant in Hindi more than Urdu. At school, the work included page writing and that too not on daily basis; plus some other works which she used to copy from others and pass the day.

As the examination approached, all was normal with her and no one cared much knowing that success would be certain. Surprisingly one day, as I returned from college, I found her coming to me with a gloomy face. When I enquired, she told me that her next examination was of Urdu and she was unable to write properly and would fail in the subject. In spite of my encouragement and advice not to bother about low marks, she was diffident and refused to sit in examination. This made me a little serious and I asked for her datesheet, only to find that there were three complete off days before the Urdu examination. I called for her text and notebook, and discovered to my dismay that she was not able to read or write Urdu at all. The year’s homework included writing pages (repetition of the above line given on paper by teacher and some short essay type writings). So, I decided to give her my best, without losing courage in next 3.5 days. This was indeed an experiment inevitable, with little success probably. I thought over it seriously and came to the conclusion that being a language, the alphabets and words need to be correctly understood, written or pronounced. Then other things could follow. My daughter wanted me to give, in writing, an essay and other words which she would cram and re-write there so as to get sufficient pass marks.

My daughter wanted me to give, in writing, an essay and other words which she would cram and re-write there so as to get sufficient pass marks. Normally, at that stage of examination, everybody would like her child to do the same to pass the examination. I took the risk 

Normally, at that stage of examination, everybody would like her child to do the same to pass the examination. I took the risk and did the following – I asked my child to read alphabets and pronounce them correctly and then write them a number of times on pages. I gave her half-a-day to converse with this thoroughly. This done, I asked her to play and enjoy, without giving her any cause to panic although I was panicking myself. Next morning, I gave her lesson in joining alphabets to coin words and asked her to remember their pronunciation and write pages. The second day, I gave her dictation on writing words and sentences, thoroughly. At the end of the day, I found her full of enthusiasm as she was now satisfied that she knows how to write words properly. This infused her with confidence, and on third day, I simply asked her to read from book and then write some sentences, with correct spelling. This was the basic and a little guidance on small essays helped her to go for examination with confidence and hope. After the examination, she was very happy but was desperate also, as she had left a few questions unanswered. One thing was there that the questions she had attempted, had been done properly – enabling her to get first division marks, with third position in class.

My point in short is, if you are unable to complete full course, study little but study thoroughly. This will not only ensure your success in examination, but also will help you develop a nature in general, which can stand in good stead in all other walks of life.

All the best for your exams!

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